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Abstracto:

Abstract

Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) encasement is often considered a contraindication for an endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach. We report a patient with a tuberculum sella meningioma with ACA encasement, in whom a gross total excision was achieved through an endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal transtuberculum, transplanum approach. The tumor was sharply dissected along the left ACA using meticulous bimanual sharp dissection after internal decompression. Moreover, the medial optic canals were opened and the optic nerves decompressed. A gasket seal closure with a nasoseptal flap was performed, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day four with improved vision. This case highlights the ability to remove planum and tuberculum meningiomas with vascular encasement through an endonasal endoscopic approach with the potential for safe vascular dissection. The absence of luminal narrowing can be used to assure the likelihood of a safe arachnoid plane.

Keywords: endonasal endoscopy, tuberculum sella meningioma, anterior cerebral artery encasement, arachnoid plane, transtuberculum/transplanum approach.
Cureus. 2015 Aug; 7(8): e311.


Abstracto:

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the substantial impact of cavernous sinus invasion (CSI) in pituitary adenoma surgery, its radiologic determination has been inconsistent and variable, and the role of endonasal endoscopic surgery has been unclear. This is a systematic review and pooled data meta-analysis of the literature to ascertain the best radiologic criteria for CSI and verify the efficacy and safety of an endonasal endoscopic approach.

World Neurosurg. 2016 Dec;96:36-46. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.08.088. Epub 2016 Aug 30.


Abstracto:

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Regrowth of the lesion after surgical removal of pituitary adenomas is uncommon unless subtotal resection was originally achieved in the first surgery. Treatment for recurrent tumor can involve surgery or radiotherapy. Locations of residual tumor may vary based on the original approach. The authors evaluated the specific sites of residual or recurrent tumor after different transsphenoidal approaches and describe the surgical outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperation. METHODS The authors analyzed a prospectively collected database of a consecutive series of patients who had undergone endoscopic endonasal surgeries for residual or recurrent pituitary adenomas after an original transsphenoidal microscopic or endoscopic surgery. The site of the recurrent tumor and outcome after reoperation were noted and correlated with the primary surgical approach. The chi-square or Fisher exact test was used to compare categorical variables, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare continuous variables between surgical groups. RESULTS Forty-one patients underwent surgery for residual/recurrent pituitary adenoma from 2004 to 2015 at Weill Cornell Medical College. The previous treatment was a transsphenoidal microscopic (n = 22) and endoscopic endonasal (n = 19) surgery. In 83.3% patients (n = 30/36) there was postoperative residual tumor after the initial surgery. A residual tumor following endonasal endoscopic surgery was less common in the sphenoid sinus (10.5%; 2/19) than it was after microscopic transsphenoidal surgery (72.7%; n =16/22; p = 0.004). Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 58.5%, and either GTR or near-total resection was achieved in 92.7%. Across all cases, the average extent of resection was 93.7%. The rate of GTR was lower in patients with Knosp-Steiner Grade 3-4 invasion (p < 0.0005). Postoperative CSF leak was seen in only one case (2.4%), which stopped with lumbar drainage. Visual fields improved in 52.9% (n = 9/17) of patients and were stable in 47% (n = 8/17). Endocrine remission was achieved in 77.8% (n = 14/18) of cases, 12 by surgery alone and 2 by adjuvant medical (n = 1) and radiation (n = 1) therapy. New diabetes insipidus occurred in 4.9% (n = 2/41) of patients-in one of whom an additional single anterior hormonal axis was compromised-and 9.7% (n = 4/41) of patients had a new anterior pituitary hormonal insufficiency. CONCLUSIONS Endonasal endoscopic reoperation is extremely effective at removing recurrent or residual pituitary adenomas that remain after a prior surgery, and it may be preferable to radiation therapy particularly in symptomatic patients. Achievement of GTR is less common when lateral cavernous sinus invasion is present. The locations of residual/recurrent tumor were more likely sphenoidal and parasellar following a prior microscopic transsphenoidal surgery and sellar following a prior endonasal endoscopic surgery.

J Neurosurg. 2017 Aug;127(2):397-408. doi: 10.3171/2016.8.JNS152709. Epub 2016 Oct 28.


Abstracto:

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Craniopharyngiomas can be difficult to remove completely based on their intimate relationship with surrounding visual and endocrine structures. Reoperations are not uncommon but have been associated with higher rates of complications and lower extents of resection. So radiation is often offered as an alternative to reoperation. The endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach has been used in recent years for craniopharyngiomas previously removed with craniotomy. The impact of this approach on reoperations has not been widely investigated. METHODS The authors reviewed a prospectively acquired database of endonasal endoscopic resections of craniopharyngiomas over 11 years at Weill Cornell Medical College, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, performed by the senior authors. Reoperations were separated from first operations. Pre- and postoperative visual and endocrine function, tumor size, body mass index (BMI), quality of life (QOL), extent of resection (EOR), impact of prior radiation, and complications were compared between groups. EOR was divided into gross-total resection (GTR, 100%), near-total resection (NTR, > 95%), and subtotal resection (STR, < 95%). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS Of the total 57 endonasal surgical procedures, 22 (39%) were reoperations. First-time operations and reoperations did not differ in tumor volume, radiological configuration, or patients' BMI. Hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus (DI) were more common before reoperations (82% and 55%, respectively) compared with first operations (60% and 8.6%, respectively; p < 0.001). For the 46 patients in whom GTR was intended, rates of GTR and GTR+NTR were not significantly different between first operations (90% and 97%, respectively) and reoperations (80% and 100%, respectively). For reoperations, prior radiation and larger tumor volume had lower rates of GTR. Vision improved equally in first operations (80%) compared with reoperations (73%). New anterior pituitary deficits were more common in first operations compared with reoperations (51% vs 23%, respectively; p = 0.08), while new DI was more common in reoperations compared with first-time operations (80% vs 47%, respectively; p = 0.08). Nonendocrine complications occurred in 2 (3.6%) first-time operations and no reoperations. Tumor regrowth occurred in 6 patients (11%) over a median follow-up of 46 months and was not different between first versus reoperations, but was associated with STR (33%) compared with GTR+NTR (4%; p = 0.02) and with not receiving radiation after STR (67% vs 22%; p = 0.08). The overall BMI increased significantly from 28.7 to 34.8 kg/m2 over 10 years. Six months after surgery, there was a significant improvement in QOL, which was similar between first-time operations and reoperations, and negatively correlated with STR. CONCLUSIONS Endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal reoperation results in similar EOR, visual outcome, and improvement in QOL as first-time operations, with no significant increase in complications. EOR is more impacted by tumor volume and prior radiation. Reoperations should be offered to patients with recurrent craniopharyngiomas and may be preferable to radiation in patients in whom GTR or NTR can be achieved.

J Neurosurg. 2017 Feb;126(2):418-430. doi: 10.3171/2016.1.JNS152238. Epub 2016 May 6.


Abstracto:

BACKGROUND:

Intraventricular cavernous malformations are unusual intracranial vascular malformations; their deep anatomical location complicates their surgical management. Microsurgical approaches are the gold standard approaches for the resection of ventricular lesions, however, they imply considerable neurovascular risks

Surg Neurol Int. 2017


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